Its story concerns a group of socially-concerned misfits who perpetrate acts of public nuisance to throw a spanner into the works of the Establishment. These are not committed revolutionaries, and their actions amount to little more than elaborate pranks. Into this setting steps Jim Morgan (Brett Climo), a much harder activist who's been disabling mining machinery up north and has plans for the Melbourne band. Although he dismisses two of them as lightweight, his interest in Alice (Alison Whyte) grows as they plan a truly dangerous deed.
On the periphery of this are Nick Feast (Paul English) and Harold Hoffman (Bruce Myles). Nick, a journalist, has tracked down Harold for a radio series on activists of the past. Harold, once a radical lawyer, has faded into obscurity but has struck up a relationship with Alice.
Judith Cobb's set is creative and appropriate to the setting, comprising fragments of Melbourne buildings framed by the halo of Luna Park. James Wardlaw and Fiona Todd play the two other activists with an engaging sense of playfulness. Climo gives Morgan a powerful understatement appropriate to his character.